Expired Study
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Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202


Purpose:

Insomnia is not a natural part of aging but is higher in older adults because of a variety of factors common in later life. One of these factors may be a deficient magnesium status. This study will look at whether or not magnesium supplementation will improve sleep.


Study summary:

Insomnia affects approximately one-third of older Americans. More than half of all people aged 65 and older experience sleep problems. The prevalence of insomnia and other sleep disorders is not a natural part of aging but is high in older adults because of a variety of factors common in late life. One of those factors may be a deficient magnesium status. There is a close association between sleep architecture, especially slow wave sleep, and activity in the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. Because magnesium is a natural N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)antagonist and GABA agonist, magnesium apparently plays a key role in the regulation of sleep. Such a role is supported by supplementation, correlation, and animal studies showing that magnesium intake or status affects sleep organization.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - have sleep complaints - Score greater than 5 on Pittsburgh Global Sleep Quality Index Exclusion Criteria: - taking medications that affect sleep - taking 100 milligrams or more of magnesium - body mass index of 40 or higher - abnormal breathing conditions


NCT ID:

NCT00833092


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Forrest H Nielsen, PhD
USDA Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: October 09, 2019

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