Expired Study
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Berkeley, California 94720


Purpose:

Amblyopia, a developmental abnormality that impairs spatial vision, is a major cause of vision loss, resulting in reduced visual acuity and reduced sensitivity to contrast. This study uses psychophysical measures to study neural plasticity in adults with amblyopia.


Study summary:

Amblyopia, a developmental abnormality that impairs spatial vision, is a major cause of vision loss, resulting in reduced visual acuity and reduced sensitivity to contrast. Our previous findings (see CITATIONS) show that the adult amblyopic brain is still plastic and malleable, suggesting that active approach is potential useful in treating amblyopia. The goal of this project is to assess the limits and mechanisms of neural plasticity in amblyopic spatial vision. This study uses psychophysical measures to study neural plasticity in adults with amblyopia. Research participants will be asked to play video games with the amblyopic eye for a period of time. A range of visual functions will be monitored during the course of treatment.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Adults with amblyopia (Age >15 years) - Amblyopia: interocular visual acuity difference of at least 0.1 logMAR - All forms of amblyopia: Strabismic, anisometropic, refractive, deprivative, meridional amblyopia Exclusion Criteria: - Any ocular pathological conditions (eg macula abnormalities, glaucoma), nystagmus


NCT ID:

NCT01223716


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Roger W Li, OD, PhD
School of Optometry, Univeristy of california-Berkeley


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Berkeley, California 94720
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: August 31, 2019

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