Expired Study
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Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766


Purpose:

A patient's sun-related behavior greatly influences the likelihood of that patient developing melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. Prior research shows current educational strategies on inducing preventative behaviors such as wearing sun-protection clothing and wearing sunscreen are inadequate at effectively changing behavior when used in isolation -- patients are aware of the dangers of not engaging in these preventative measures but forgo them nonetheless. The investigators are researching methods to positively influence skin cancer prevention behaviors among melanoma survivors and their families. The first objective of this study is to compare patient and familial sun exposure and cancer screening activity before and after a patient's diagnosis with primary melanoma. The second objective of this study is to note if hanging a "Melanoma Survivor" plaque in a melanoma survivor's bathroom will significantly affect the survivor's and broader family's sun exposure and cancer screening activity. The investigators' sample of patients consists of survivors of primary cutaneous melanoma less than 4.0 mm in depth who came through the Dermatology Clinic at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and voluntarily chose to participate in the study after being informed of the nature of the research. These patients completed a confidential survey assessing sun exposure related activities immediately before and after their diagnosis. After the participants filled out the survey, the investigators asked the participants if they could nominate a family member to whom the investigators could explain the purpose of this research study to and confidentially ask an additional set of questions to evaluate the broader impact of a melanoma diagnosis. From the investigators' original sample, the investigators randomly chose a few families who would display the survivor plaque in their primary bathroom. After six-to-twelve months, during the each patient's follow up visit, the investigators asked the patient and the patient's nominated family member to fill out another survey to assess sun exposure related activity. On the surveys, no names were recorded. Everything was anonymous.


Study summary:

This study is investigating a method to positively influence skin cancer prevention behaviors among melanoma survivors and their families. The first objective is to compare patient and familial sun exposure and cancer screening activity before and after a patient's diagnosis with primary cutaneous melanoma less than 4.0 mm in depth. It is believed that the diagnosis will positively affect behavior regarding skin cancer prevention as the diagnosis of melanoma makes the risk associated with sun-exposure and skin cancer a tangible issue. The second objective is to test whether receiving a "Melanoma Survivor" plaque and posting it in a melanoma survivor's bathroom will significantly affect the survivor's and broader family's sun exposure and cancer screening activity. Marketing research has shown similar techniques have been effective in causing individuals to consume goods (e.g. getting free pens with company logos makes you more likely to buy goods from that company), and the investigators think such techniques are transferable into the field of public health.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - patient has melanoma diagnosis within past 10 years less than 4mm in depth Exclusion Criteria:


NCT ID:

NCT02457065


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Michael S Chapman, MD
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: November 18, 2019

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