Indianapolis, Indiana 46202


Purpose:

In the U.S., 5.7 million people have heart failure (HF), 915,000 new cases are diagnosed each year, and both incidence and prevalence are increasing due to the aging of the population and to better survival from ischemic heart disease. A hallmark of HF, is poor functional status that, characteristically, deteriorates as the condition progresses, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Poor functional status is associated with increased risk of hospitalization for exacerbations of HF and with increased mortality. Optimization of drug therapy and appropriate use of resynchronization therapy can improve functional status, as can patient engagement in exercise. Although exercise is recommended as a component of HF management, adherence is consistently low. This is particularly troubling because exercise has great potential as a low-risk, low-cost intervention to improve functional status and quality of life while decreasing HF symptoms and hospitalizations in patients with HF. Low adherence is due in part to inadequate strength and inability to tolerate or sustain even low levels of activity. In this study, we propose to use neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to assist patient initiation of quadriceps strengthening in order to progressively increase low exercise tolerance. NMES has been shown to improve muscle strength, exercise capacity and quality of life, in samples less than 20 of male patients with HF. Larger sample studies are needed to demonstrate efficacy of this practice to jump start patients' abilities to benefit from formalized exercise program. The purpose of this double blinded, randomized, controlled, longitudinal study is to determine if NMES will increase muscle mass and strength, decrease sedentary time, and improve HF symptoms and exercise capacity, thus improving quality of life in patients with HF. It is hypothesized that with this increase in muscle mass, patients will improve overall exercise tolerance and capacity. In addition, after the intervention patients will be better able to tolerate an exercise program thus improving adherence to exercise recommendations. After 6 weeks of intervention, patients will be encouraged to participate in a formalized exercise program.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Adult patients who have recently been hospitalized for heart failure - live at home - are receiving guideline recommended pharmacologic therapy - do not regularly exercise (10 minutes or more a day of exercise most days of the week for the past week). Exclusion Criteria: - Patients, who have undertaken cardiac rehab within the 12 months prior to enrollment - Cognitive or other impairment which prevents accurate application of intervention or inability to provide informed consent - End Stage Renal Disease or receiving mechanical ventilation - Receiving non-approved FDA-investigational agents or devices, - Has received a heart transplant, a destination Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD), pacemaker, or implantable cardiac device - previously used NMES (Neuromuscular electrical stimulation) or TENS (Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) - Uncontrolled arrhythmia's or 3 degree AV heart block - are unable to correctly apply and operate the device even after instruction - Those with wounds over area of proper placement of electrodes - Those who are unable to speak and write English.


NCT ID:

NCT03615469


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Christine Haedtke, PhD
Indiana University

Christine Haedtke, PhD
Phone: 317-274-5358
Email: chaedtke@iu.edu


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Indianapolis, Indiana 46202
United States

Christine Haedtke, PhD
Phone: 317-274-5358
Email: chaedtke@iu.edu

Site Status: Recruiting


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: February 04, 2019

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