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Gainesville, Florida 32608


Purpose:

Diabetes technology is changing and has quickly become an integral part of diabetes care and management. The study team plans to study the effects of introducing technology to newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients. The investigators hypothesize that early access to continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology will potentially improve satisfaction scores, hemoglobin A1c, glycemic control, reduce hypoglycemia, and ease the burden of disease when compared to new onset patients who receive standard of care access to CGM.


Study summary:

Abstract: Diabetes technology is changing and has quickly become an integral part of diabetes care and management. Typically, patients will need to wait months due to paperwork, insurance, and logistical issues before utilizing these technologies. With this project, the investigators plan to study the effects of introducing technology to newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients. It is hypothesized that early access to flash continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology will improve scores in diabetes's measures. The primary outcome with be the parent version of the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). Secondary outcomes will include other diabetes measures such as DTSQ teen version, Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS)- Parent and child version, Diabetes Distress Survey (DDS)-parent version, PedsQL- parent and child versions. The study team will also look at other diabetes outcomes including A1c, time in range, and reduction in hypoglycemia. Background: Type 1 diabetes is a complex disease requiring newly diagnosed pediatric patients and families to learn how to check blood glucoses, inject insulin, count carbohydrates, treat hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia, and perform many other complex tasks, all within the first few days after diagnosis. Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and flash glucose monitors have emerged as important diabetes technologies towards providing improved care and easing the burden of disease. These technologies are most typically introduced to families in the outpatient setting 2-3 months following diagnosis due to logistical issues related to insurance coverage. Barriers to access include requirements for insurance prior authorization, lack of immediate availability at local pharmacies, need for patient training, and the historical bias towards requiring finger stick glucose monitoring as the basis for diabetes management. Despite these barriers, the data supports the observation that CGM technology provides for better understanding of diabetes, improved quality of life for parents and children, reduced frequency of hypoglycemia, and improved A1c. This project will potentially show the feasibility of introducing these technologies at diagnosis. New onset type 1 diabetes patients will be randomized to receive either a Freestyle Libre flash glucose monitoring system immediately at diagnosis or to delayed use of CGM (standard of care).


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus Exclusion Criteria: - No diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus


NCT ID:

NCT03736083


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Paul Hiers, MD
University of Florida


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Gainesville, Florida 32608
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: February 04, 2019

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