Expired Study
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Clinical Trial 16007

Bethesda, MD 20892


Study Summary:

About the studies

Warm weather brings outdoor fun, but also the risk of tick bites, which can cause Lyme disease. The Lyme disease rash is usually round or oval and gradually expands. It may be all red or have a bull’s-eye appearance. If untreated, the infection may spread to other parts of the body and cause other problems, including paralysis of the face (called facial palsy); severe headaches and neck stiffness because of meningitis; heart palpitations and dizziness because of changes in heartbeat; and intermittent bouts of arthritis, with joint pain and swelling, particularly involving the knees. The studies offer evaluation, therapy, and follow up to patients with Lyme disease in hopes of learning more about the infection.

Who can participate?

If you suspect that you have Lyme disease, you may be eligible to participate in one of the research studies currently underway at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD.

What does the study involve?

Treatment will include only medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration and will be administered according to accepted dose schedules. All diagnostic tests and treatments will be done according to standard medical practice for Lyme disease. No experimental treatment will be offered.

If you choose to participate, you will be asked to:

  • Provide informed consent
  • Attend study visits
  • Provide blood samples and undergo other study-related exams and procedures

Participants in some studies may be paid for their time.


Clinical trials are medical research studies designed to test the safety and/or effectiveness of new investigational drugs, devices, or treatments in humans. These studies are conducted worldwide for a range of conditions and illnesses. Learn more about clinical research and participating in a study at About Clinical Trials.