Clinical Trial 55286

Philadelphia, PA 19114


Summary:

Study Details
The Step-Up HS Research Study is a clinical research study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug compared to a placebo in reducing symptoms and improving the quality of life for participants living with HS. Participants receive either the investigational drug or a placebo (something that looks like the investigational drug but has no effect on the body), both administered as oral treatments.


Participants will be assigned randomly (by chance) to receive either the investigational drug or a placebo for 16 weeks. After this, a participant’s continued study treatment will be determined by their clinical symptoms, test results, and examinations. Participants will receive the investigational drug or placebo for another 20 weeks, and this treatment may be assigned randomly (by chance) again. All participants will then enter a 68-week extension period where they will continue receiving the same investigational drug or placebo they were taking at the end of the second period. If a participant’s symptoms do not improve enough after participating in the



Criteria:

Have been diagnosed with HS for at least 6 months

Haven’t seen enough improvement from a previous HS treatment


Qualified Participants May Receive:

Taking part in a clinical research study may offer several benefits including:
Getting actively involved in your own healthcare
Having access to investigational drugs
Helping others by progressing medical research
Qualified participants will receive all study-related drugs (the active investigational drug or placebo) and study-related care at no cost.
Participants may be compensated for travel and expenses. (up to $1,900)


Clinical trials are medical research studies designed to test the safety and/or effectiveness of new investigational drugs, devices, or treatments in humans. These studies are conducted worldwide for a range of conditions and illnesses. Learn more about clinical research and participating in a study at About Clinical Trials.