Clinical Trial 42770

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Tomball, TX 77375


Study Summary:

Study 42770 Flyer
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Obesity remains a major problem for adolescents and teens in the United States. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data indicate that 20.5% of adolescents age 12 to 16 years met the definition of obesity in 2011–2014. Obesity in childhood or adolescence could increase the risk of adult obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia.

Research studies are exploring if a new treatment combined with a diet modification program, that is approved to help treat obesity in adults, can be considered an option for weight management in adolescents.

Researchers seek adolescents and teens aged 12 -16 who currently are overweight or obese and have not have previous success in managing weight. Participants are required to attend study visits at the research site will be compensated for participating in a study.


Qualified Participants Must:

• Adolescents and teens aged 12-16
• Who are considered above the average weight for their age
• Able to attend study visits at the research site


Qualified Participants May Receive:

  • Your child may see an improvement in your weight and overall health.
  • Your child will be helping to advance medical research aimed at improving kids’ health.
  • You will be compensated up for participating in a study.
  • You will be helping to advance medical research.


Study is Available At:

DM Clinical Research
13406 Medical Complex Dr
Tomball, TX 77375
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If you or someone you care for is interested in participating in this clinical trial and lives within 50 miles of the clinic, please complete the form below and click 'I Am Interested In This Study'

Clinical trials are medical research studies designed to test the safety and/or effectiveness of new investigational drugs, devices, or treatments in humans. These studies are conducted worldwide for a range of conditions and illnesses. Learn more about clinical research and participating in a study at About Clinical Trials.