Placebos And How They Are Used In Clinical Research

An inactive treatment or drug used in clinical trials is known as a placebo. Another term commonly used for a placebo is sugar pill or dummy treatment. A placebo is used in placebo-controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness of potential new treatments. Participants are carefully monitored by clinical trial staff to compare the effectiveness of the study treatment in if those assigned to receive active study medication versus those assigned to receive a placebo.

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Wearables and Their Use in Clinical Trials

Wearable devices play a significant role in the ability of the general public to monitor their health. The ability for wearables to collect and store data at any location makes them a promising addition to clinical trials, but how can they be implemented?

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Virtual Technologies Used in Clinical Research

Virtual or remote clinical trials are becoming increasingly popular due to the many benefits they offer study participants, including the ease of participating from home or office and reduced time commitment. Remote clinical trials also benefit the research team because they can recruit a more diverse participant population from a wider geographic area. For the most part, virtual clinical trials are possible due technologies that have been developed or adapted for clinical trial use.

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Stages of Drug Development

Drug development is a multi-stage process that strives to bring new drugs to patients. Each of the stages involved can be very time-consuming - that's why it takes roughly 10-15 years to complete the process and make a new drug ready for use in the patients.

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Right-to-Try Law

In 2018, the landmark Right to Try act (RTT) was passed in Congress. The bill was adopted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and was first implemented in Colorado followed by other states. This act provides a possible way for patients who have been diagnosed with life-threatening diseases or conditions who have tried all approved treatment options and who are unable to participate in a clinical trial to access certain unapproved (i.e., investigational) treatments.

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Emergency Use Authorization vs. FDA Approval

With the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine recently receiving its FDA approval for those aged 12 and older, some people may be wondering what this means for the Moderna and Johnsons & Johnson versions, as well as why these vaccines were distributed and administered prior to FDA approval.

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Decentralized Clinical Trials - What Are They?

Clinical trials are constantly evolving to keep in step with the medical field and to make it as convenient as possible for volunteers to join. One advancement is the introduction and adaptation of decentralized clinical trials.

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The First Recognized Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are essential for advancing medicine and ensuring that procedures and treatments are safe and effective for patients. However, these trials were not always at the current gold standard.

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What is the Difference Between A Clinical Trial and A Clinical Study

People often use the terms "clinical trial" and "clinical study" interchangeably. Both fall under the umbrella term "clinical research," which is the study of health and illness in humans. This research involves people voluntarily participating under conditions set by the clinical researchers. If considering participating in clinical research, it's important to understand the differences between these terms.

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9 Clinical Trial Myths

Clinical trials are an essential part of putting new medications on the market. However, there are many common myths surrounding them. This article will explain the common myths surrounding clinical trials, including why some of these myths come to be.

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Who Is Involved In A Clinical Trial?

Clinical research is required for the continued medical innovations that we enjoy to this day. Without clinical research and the trials that they involve, we would have trouble deciding when treatment is safe and available for use by humans. Depending on the subject of the study as well as its stage of development, clinical trials may require involvement from varying professionals as well as treatment subjects.

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Clinical Trials: What Will Change in 2021?

The very first clinical trial was performed in 1747 when 12 sailors with scurvy were divided up and given one of six agents after spending two whole months out on the sea. The results of that one trial helped prove that fruit could help get sailors back to action. Since that one point in history, millions of clinical trials have been performed, and the research efforts have grown more efficient, sophisticated, and effecti

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What You Should Know about Online Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are generally associated with in-person visits. A person will sign up for a trial and, in doing so, pledge to check in with researchers or healthcare professionals. There is usually a set number of visits scheduled, so staff can monitor the participant's progress. This is the standard formula, but like so many things in life, it's changing with the advent of better communication tools.

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What are Clinical Trial Phases?

Clinical trials are carried out to test the effectiveness and safety of an investigational drug or medical device on people. Researchers move on to the human clinical trial stage after they have already performed pre-clinical research including animal studies on the investigational drug, and it's determined that the drug is potentially beneficial enough to be tried with human participants. There are five clinical trial phases to ensure the drug is both safe and effective.

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Why are Clinical Trials Important?

When it comes to the advancement of knowledge of medical treatments and providing effective care, clinical trials serve a valuable purpose. Hundreds of thousands of clinical trials may be registered at any given time in every state and in numerous countries around the globe. Such impressive numbers go to show just how important clinical trials must be, but why are clinical trials important?

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What are the benefits of Clinical Trials?

Clinical trials are a type of research used to see how certain healthcare interventions affect people. This type of study could focus on medical, behavioral, or surgical types of interventions. They may be used to study new treatments to see if they're better than currently available options, as well as methods for prevention, early detection, or better quality of life for certain health conditions or diseases. There are many benefits of clinical trials and participating in them.

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Are Clinical Trials Safe

Clinical trials are an important part of bringing pharmaceutical drugs and other interventions to the public for use as approved medical treatments. They help to show whether a treatment method is safe and effective. But you might be wondering about clinical trials safety during the research process and whether you would be putting your health and safety at risk if you participated in a trial.

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